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Bobby Franklin: Press

Bobby Franklin Insanity - Mr. Insanity (2006)
His fans have been waiting nearly four decades for Bobby Franklin to tell his musical story, and Mr. Insanity is his vehicle for delivery. It summarizes compositions and recordings that span a variety of styles and years. With a Curtis Mayfield-influenced falsetto, he runs through a fine 70s ballad like "Sweeter Love" and then credibly follows it with the funky "Booty In Da House" and the electronic dance number "Don't Drop the Bomb." Most of the album is an eclectic collection of P-Funk style cuts, often with interesting political undertones. It's both nostalgic and relevant in a current context, and makes for a surprisingly good listen.
Chris Rizik - Soul Tracks (Dec 28, 2007)
(An Excerpt from BM Magazine January 1975 by Tony Cummings writer.)
Few discs played in the Northern discos when BM’s first “Northern Soul” feature appeared in June “74” Boby Franklin’s “The Ladies Choice is one of the few-in-fact its popularity is greater than ever, and now the vocal as well as the backing track are packing the floor at The Backpost, Mecca and other clubs.

Boby (that’s how he spells it) is a Detroit based soul artist who emerged on the recording scene in 1969. Ironically, his style was as far removed from what is traditionally dubbed “Northern Soul” as possible. His music was in the same wah-wah funk eclectic direction as that into which Sly Stone had pushed black music. His first discs were cut in Chicago in 1969 when Boby fronted an extraordinary group who fused Henrixonia guitar (played by Mike Anthony), Sly influences and a compulsive rhythmic feel. But despite “Bring It On Down To Me, Pt. 1 & 2” being a local hit, Boby Franklin’s Insanity didn’t make it with Thomas Records. A second 45 on the label, “Paradise”, sunk without a trace. The group then recorded in Detroit where, in 1970, they cut one of the great funky wah wah discs of the decade. It’s appeal somehow didn’t make it a DJ spinner. In Brittain Pye, even considered releasing the record, the Johnny Terry (formerly of the Drifters) composition “Don’t Lose What You Got (Trying To Get Back What You Had)” despite its inexplicable US sales failure but somehow it never happened. Today the disc has still to be discovered (by the funk discos possibly?) The strange way the song suddenly shudders into a girl chorus straight out of the old Motown era and then reverts back to the baadst of baad funk riffs, was and is a concept of startling originality.

In 1972, Boby Franklin and Friends had “This Is The Place” out on Lakeside Records but the disc’s localized distribution hampered any sales, and the same can be said of Franklin’s newest release “The Lady’s Choice”. It was cut for the tiny independent Fee Records and although given a kind of “national” distribution (when the master was picked up by Paramount Records) neither label’s version had appeared in particularly large quantities. Hopefully Pye will Disco Demand it (though surely more British labels must have now awoken to the Northern scenes commercial potential!), in the meantime, the dancers move to the haunting, undulating beat of a record driven by the coolest vibes heard since the demise of Fred Smith.

If the disco did “go over ground” Franklin, with management handled by the Detroit Emeralds-who bought the original copy of The Lady’s Choice” to Britain which started the disco exposure-could whip a true great unknown into the country. Now wouldn’t that be a gas…
TONY CUMMINGS
Tony Cummings - BM Magazine (Nov 23, 2007)
CD BABY: the best independent music from the cutest little record store on the web. A fun, easy place for you to hear and buy great new music. ... bit of everythang. The ladies can shake dat a$$ and ... This CD offers the discerning music lover a choice package ... hip hop at its finest. BOBBY FRANKLIN INSANITY: Mr. Insanity ...
CD Baby (Nov 23, 2007)
Bobby Franklin Insanity - Mr. Insanity
His fans have been waiting nearly four decades for Bobby Franklin to tell his musical story, and Mr. Insanity is his vehicle for delivery. It summarizes compositions and recordings that span a variety of styles and years. With a Curtis Mayfield-influenced falsetto, he runs through a fine 70s ballad like "Sweeter Love" and then credibly follows it with the funky "Booty In Da House" and the electronic dance number "Don't Drop the Bomb." Most of the album is an eclectic collection of P-Funk style cuts, often with interesting political undertones. It's both nostalgic and relevant in a current context, and makes for a surprisingly good listen.
CR
CR - Soul Tracks Review (Nov 23, 2007)